Posts Tagged 'Writer’s Digest Guide to Query Letters'

Ask Wendy: Your Writing and Publishing Questions Answered

 
By Wendy Burt-ThomasWendy Burt
 

Q: I’m thinking new publications might be an untapped resource for freelance writers. Where can I find out about magazine launches?

A: Yes, new magazines can be a great place for experienced AND beginning writers to break in. Although most new magazines do have a staff in place, some are still interested in using freelancers but may not know where to find them. Also, new publications aren’t as likely to be saturated with queries as those that are already established. Here are some places to learn about new launches:

  • www.MrMagazine.com. Samir Husni is probably the leader on what’s new in the publishing world. He also interviews editors and publishers so you get a behind-the-scenes view of what’s going on at certain magazines. He also has a blog that is updated much more regularly than his website.
  • www.mediabistro.com  Although most people think of Media Bistro as a job site for those in the creative industries, it’s also a good place to find out about magazine launch parties. (READ: launch party = new magazine) 
    http://www.minonline.com Min Magazine and Min Online are dedicated to leaders and branding experts in the magazine industry. Although access to some material is limited, you can view quite a bit about magazine launches for free.
  • http://crazedlist.org  This site allows you to search ALL cities on CraigsList.org at once. Do a search for “new magazine” in the “jobs” section. Sometimes the ads will be for salespeople, but that doesn’t mean you can’t track down the publication with a Google search and pitch a query.
     
 

The Writer's Digest Guide to Query LettersWendy Burt-Thomas is a full-time freelance writer, editor and copywriter with more than 1,000 published pieces. Her work has appeared in such varied publications as MSNBC.com, NYTimes.com, Family Circle and American Fitness. She is the author of three books: Oh, Solo Mia! The Hip Chick’s Guide to Fun for Work It, Girl! 101 Tips for the Hip Working Chick (McGraw-Hill, 2003); and The Writer’s Digest Guide to Query Letters (Writer’s Digest, 2008). Visit her at http://www.GuideToQueryLetters.com or her blog, http://askWendy.wordpress.com.

 

 

 

Ask Wendy: Your Writing Questions Answered

 By Wendy Burt-Thomas                         
                                                                                     Wendy Burt
Q: I’ve been trying to get a book deal but keep getting ‘near-misses.’ Can you interpret some of these rejections?
 
Rejection #1:
“We only publish authors with platforms.”
Translation: We’re a small publishing house with no budget to promote you and you didn’t convince us that you’ve got a way to do it yourself.
 
Rejection #2:
“We only work with experts in their field.”
Translation: We don’t feel you’re qualified to tackle this subject.
 
Rejection #3: “The book didn’t quite live up to our expectations.”
Translation: We liked your original idea/sample chapters, but the book didn’t hold my interest. 
Rejection #4: “This isn’t right for us, but have you tried…”
Translation: This is a good piece of writing and even though it’s not a match for us, I’m willing to refer you to someone else.
 
The Writer's Digest Guide to Query LettersWendy Burt-Thomas is a full-time freelance writer, editor and copywriter with more than 1,000 published pieces. Her work has appeared in such varied publications as MSNBC.com, NYTimes.com, Family Circle and American Fitness. She is the author of three books: Oh, Solo Mia! The Hip Chick’s Guide to Fun for One (McGraw-Hill, 2001); Work It, Girl! 101 Tips for the Hip Working Chick (McGraw-Hill, 2003); and The Writer’s Digest Guide to Query Letters (Writer’s Digest, 2008). Visit her at http://www.GuideToQueryLetters.com

 

Ask Wendy: Should I Send My Social Security Number?

wendywotr.gifBy Wendy Burt-Thomas

Q: Why do some places ask you to submit your Social Security Number with your submission? Is it safe to do this?

A: Magazines need your Social Security Number because if they pay you, they are required to report it to the government. My opinion is that you should NOT include your SSN with a submission, even if it’s requested in the writer’s guidelines. (Fraud experts believe that stolen SSNs are the leading cause of identity theft.) To get around the issue, simply write “Social Security Number provided upon request” to indicate that you read the writer’s guidelines but would prefer not to disclose the information until necessary. Upon acceptance, you should be sent a contract in which you provide all your information to receive payment. If possible, mail the contract back rather than scanning it and emailing it. I’ve never heard of an editor rejecting a piece simply because the writer did not include her Social Security Number.

The Writer's Digest Guide to Query Letters by Wendy Burt-ThomasWendy Burt-Thomas is a full-time freelance writer, editor and copywriter with more than 1,000 published pieces. Her work has appeared in such varied publications as MSNBC.com, NYTimes.com, Family Circle and American Fitness. She is the author of three books: Oh, Solo Mia! The Hip Chick’s Guide to Fun for One (McGraw-Hill, 2001); Work It, Girl! 101 Tips for the Hip Working Chick (McGraw-Hill, 2003); and The Writer’s Digest Guide to Query Letters (Writer’s Digest, 2008). Visit her at http://www.GuideToQueryLetters.com or her blog, http://askWendy.wordpress.com.


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