Archive for the 'Abigail Green' Category

Understanding Personal Essays: Get Your Essays Into Print

Abigail GreenBy Abigail Green
So you’ve chosen the perfect topic, crafted a solid lead and conclusion, and revised (and revised and revised) your essay until it shines. Now what? Now you need to find a place to publish it. First the bad news: finding markets for personal essays (especially ones that pay well) can be tough. Now the good news: finding potential markets has never been easier, thanks to a plethora of online and print market guides, not to mention blogs, web forums and e-zines for writers, such as this one.
 
While I subscribe to several market guides and find them immensely helpful for such insider info as Q and A’s with editors, contact information and rates, these guides are no shortcut to studying a publication in-depth on your own. In fact, I have never sold any of my essays to a market I didn’t read first. When you have a magazine in hand, for example, it’s easier to flip back and forth between the writers’ bylines and the masthead to determine whether a certain piece is staff-written or open to freelancers.
 
Once you’ve targeted and researched an essay market, you should have the name and contact info of an editor in hand. If not, pick up the phone. You’ll usually find the editorial phone number below the masthead in print publications. Tell the receptionist you’re a freelance writer who wishes to submit an essay for publication and ask who handles that department. Most times you’ll get a name and e-mail address this way.
 
The most common way to submit an essay is “on spec”-meaning, you write it first and submit it in its entirety with no guarantee of publication. This bothers some writers, but look at it this way: it’s hard to convince an editor of a statement like, “My essay will be a poignant/thoughtful/humorous account of adopting an ornery Siamese cat” without enclosing the completed piece.
 
Next, you should write a compelling cover letter similar to a query letter. Reel in the editor with an attention-grabbing lead and say why you think your essay would be a good fit. Do you have to write a cover letter? Especially since you’re enclosing the whole essay? No, but if you were an editor, which would compel you to keep reading?
 
1.     “Enclosed is my 500-word essay, ‘The Cat Chronicles.’ Thanks for your consideration.”
2.     Or, “I knew I had my hands full the morning after I brought Svetlana home when my living room looked like the inside of a snow globe. That was my first clue that perhaps adopting a cat wasn’t as simple as I’d thought.
My enclosed essay, ‘The Cat Chronicles,’ discusses the adjustment period after welcoming a new pet. I hope you’ll find my 500-word piece a good fit for your essay department.”
 
Then, after you’ve spell-checked everything (especially the editor’s name!), send that baby out. And, just like when you pitch an article, follow up after a couple of weeks and start looking for back-up markets in case your essay’s not a fit for your first choice.
 
It may take one try or 20, but if you’ve got a solid personal essay and a strong desire to get it published, you will. I have years of personal experience-and numerous student success stories-to prove it.
 
 
Abigail Green has published more than 150 articles and essays in regional and national publications including American Baby, Baltimore Magazine, Bride’s, Cooking Light, and Health. Her work also appears in the new book, “A Cup of Comfort for New Mothers.” (Adams Media, 2009). Abby holds a B.A. from Vassar College and an M.A. in publishing from the University of Baltimore. She writes the “Crib Notes” column for The Writer Mama e-zine and the “Understanding Personal Essays” column for Writers on the Rise. A mother of two boys, she blogs about parenting, publishing and more at http://diaryofanewmom.blogspot.com.

Understanding Personal Essays: Short and Sweet

By Abigail GreenAbigail Green
The consensus among most writers I know is that it’s much easier to write long than it is to write short. Longer word counts leave the writer space for description, exposition, and often, extra fluff you don’t really need.
 
In his landmark book, On Writing Well, author William Zinsser puts it like this:
 
“It’s amazing how often an editor can just throw away the first three or four paragraphs of an article … and start with the paragraph where the writer begins to sound like himself. Not only are those first few paragraphs hopelessly impersonal and ornate; they don’t say anything. They are a self-conscious attempt at a fancy introduction, and none is necessary.”
 
Short essays, by definition, only have room for the “meat.” You have to be relentless with the red pen and whittle your words down to the bare essentials.
 
Lots of my writing students moan and fret when they have to cut their essays to meet a shorter word count. They worry that they’ll lose the good stuff or that the piece will no longer have their voice. On the contrary, tightening an essay is often what really makes it sing.
 
For example, consider the “What I Really Know” column in AARP Bulletin. In 300 words or less, writers tackle such topics as terminal illness, love, and freedom. Ami E. Rodland’s “What I Really Know About Freedom: A Second Wind” proves without a shadow of a doubt that sometimes less is more when it comes to word count. Reading her essay, I felt the weight of her grief and the buoyancy of her newfound independence. Pretty impressive for a mere seven paragraphs, no?
 
For another example of a short but powerful personal essay, check out the most recent winner of the Erma Bombeck Writing Competition. In just 385 words, writer Toni Giarnese evokes all five senses in her poignant essay about making ravioli with her grandmother.
 
To write a short essay, you don’t have to sit down at your pad or keyboard and eke out a few hundred perfectly chosen words. Rather, write the first draft as you normally would. Then revise, tighten, and revise some more until, as Zinsser said, you get to the part where you start to really say something and sound like yourself. The result will be both short and sweet.

 

 
Abigail Green has published more than 150 articles and essays in regional and national publications including American Baby, Baltimore Magazine, Bride’s, Cooking Light, and Health. Her work also appears in the new book, “A Cup of Comfort for New Mothers.” (Adams Media, 2009). Abby holds a B.A. from Vassar College and an M.A. in publishing from the University of Baltimore. She writes the “Crib Notes” column for The Writer Mama e-zine and the “Understanding Personal Essays” column for Writers on the Rise. A mother of two boys, she blogs about parenting, publishing and more at http://diaryofanewmom.blogspot.com.

Understanding Personal Essays: Food for Thought

Abigail GreenBy Abigail Green
In “Remembrance of Things Past,” Marcel Proust waxed poetic about that quintessential French cake, the madeleine. After tasting a single spoonful of sweet, tea-soaked crumbs, he writes: “I had ceased now to feel mediocre, contingent, mortal. Whence could it have come to me, this all-powerful joy? I sensed that it was connected with the taste of the tea and the cake…”
 
If, like Proust, you enjoy writing about food almost as much as you enjoying eating it, consider the culinary-themed personal essay.
 
In an essay in the New York Times’ “Generations” department , author Rich Prior writes about asking his mother to pass down his grandmother’s Irish bread recipe. As he and his aging mother sift and measure and mix in her kitchen, Prior learns about his family history and begins to become aware of his mother’s mortality. Lesson #1: it’s not just about the baked goods.
 
This is further evidenced by Suzan Colon’s essay, “Muffin Manifesto” in a recent issue of O, the Oprah magazine. She writes that in the face of economic uncertainty and anxiety, she started baking muffins to do something practical and comforting. The essay continues by exploring the surprising reaction of her feminist friends to her new hobby. It also includes her muffin recipe. Lesson #2: it’s not just about the baked goods.
 
Even if you’re writing for a food magazine, a personal essay should never be “just” about food. The food is merely the jumping off point for the underlying theme-a relationship with a parent, a reexamination of feminism, one’s own mortality. As I tell my writing students over and over, a successful personal essay must have some movement, change, or epiphany from the beginning to the end; otherwise, it’s just a bunch of anecdotes. Or, in the case of a culinary-themed essay, a food review.
 
Food is such an intricate part of our lives that it lends itself naturally to the memories, emotions, and sensations that make a personal essay come alive. So go grab a cup of tea and a cookie and start writing!
 
  
Abigail Green has published more than 150 articles and essays in regional and national publications including American Baby, Baltimore Magazine, Bride’s, Cooking Light, and Health. Her work also appears in the new book, “A Cup of Comfort for New Mothers.” (Adams Media, 2009). Abby holds a B.A. from Vassar College and an M.A. in publishing from the University of Baltimore. She writes the “Crib Notes” column for The Writer Mama e-zine and the “Understanding Personal Essays” column for Writers on the Rise. A mother of two boys, she blogs about parenting, publishing and more at http://diaryofanewmom.blogspot.com.

Understanding Personal Essays: What’s Your Opinion

Abigail GreenBy Abigail Green


Think op-ed pages are all angry letters about parking meters and people spouting off about politics? Think again. The op-ed pages of many newspapers are great places to publish timely, topical personal essays.

Depending on who you ask, op-ed is short for “opposite the editorial page” or “opinion-editorial.” Either way, it’s often a spot that’s open to non-staff writers of first-person pieces.

Yes, sometimes these essays offer up a political viewpoint, but not always. I’ve published essays in the op-ed section on topics including my imaginary conversation with Jennifer Aniston following her break-up with Brad Pitt, and going to see the Sex and the City movie.

The key is that your essay has to be timely. If you breed Portuguese water dogs, you would have been in like Flynn with an essay on that topic when the Obamas chose the White House pet. Of course, you also have to beat other writers to the punch. That means if your piece is about the American Idol finale, you’d better write that sucker the minute the show’s over and fire it off to the editor that night. If you wait a couple of days, it’ll be old news. This is one instance where simultaneous submissions are fine.

Essays on the op-ed page are often in the 500-700-word range. Your best bet is to study the print version (at a library if you don’t subscribe), since essays can be hard to find on newspaper web sites. It should be easy to find the right editor’s e-mail address. Pay can range from nothing to several hundred dollars. If a piece has the potential to be reprinted, you may come out ahead.

More and more these days, newspapers don’t have the budget to pay for unsolicited freelance submissions. Consider whether the clip and the exposure are worth it. I once negotiated with an editor who couldn’t pay for my essay to print my blog address in my bio at the end. That was worth it to me. Besides, the topic was so time-sensitive that I couldn’t possibly have sold it to any weekly or monthly publication.

If you’re an opinionated writer with a finger on the pulse of current events, the op-ed page may be just the place for your personal essay.

Abigail Green has published more than 150 articles and essays in regional and national publications including American Baby, Baltimore Magazine, Bride’s, Cooking Light, and Health. Her work also appears in the new book, “A Cup of Comfort for New Mothers.” (Adams Media, 2009). Abby holds a B.A. from Vassar College and an M.A. in publishing from the University of Baltimore. She writes the “Crib Notes” column for The Writer Mama e-zine and the “Understanding Personal Essays” column for Writers on the Rise. A mother of two boys, she blogs about parenting, publishing and more at http://diaryofanewmom.blogspot.com.

Columnist’s News!

Thirsty by Kristin Bair O'KeeffeKRISTIN BAIR O’KEEFFE has launched a new website and blog. Here’s a sneak peek at her forthcoming novel’s cover.

Kristin Bair O’Keeffe’s debut novel, Thirsty, will be published by Swallow Press in 2009. A family saga that explores domestic abuse, race, class, and Pittsburgh’s mighty steel industry, Thirsty tells the story of Klara Bozic, a Croatian immigrant who seeks the strength-through love and friendship-to leave an abusive husband.

Can Klara rise above her circumstances and lay claim to her own peaceful spot in the world? Look for Thirsty in Fall 2009 to find out!

ABIGAIL GREEN’S essay, “Taking Care,” appears in the new anthology A Cup of Comfort for New Mothers: Stories that celebrate the miracle of life  (Adams Media, March 2009). Stay abreast of her success over at Diary of a New Mom.

Book By Book by Cindy HudsonCINDY HUDSON’S Book By Book, The Complete Guide to Creating Mother-Daughter Book Clubs is coming this fall from Seal Press.

I recently interviewed Cindy about her nonfiction book pitching and writing process over at The Writer Mama Riffs blog.

You can read the complete interview here.

Understanding Personal Essays: Memoir Essays

By Abigail Green
Abigail Green“As a child in the late 1940s, I knew it was spring when I smelled newly mown lawns in the neighborhood.”  So begins Ronald J. Barwell’s essay in  AARP Bulletin. The column “What I Really Know” solicits 250-word essays on various topics, such as marriage, letter writing, and spring fever. Most of these essays would fall under the category of memoir. They spring from a childhood memory, an old photograph, or the recollection of a long-gone loved one.

 
Many people think of books when they hear the word “memoir,” but there’s actually a whole category of essays that falls under that subject. In fact, many book-length memoirs are a series of essays strung together between one cover.
Within memoir, there are vastly different sub-categories as well. An essay about your late grandmother’s famous coconut cake could find a home in a food magazine. A memoir about a childhood summer vacation might be a fit for a travel magazine. There’s even a market for erotica memoirs. (See Nerve.com under “features,” then “personal essays.” Warning: reader discretion is advised.)
 
On her web site, author Joan Tornow provides sample memoir essays on topics ranging from Thanksgiving turkey to being a new teacher. Check out the one titled “Crayon Magic” for a particularly good example of this type of essay. She advises would-be memoir writers to read as many memoirs as they can, begin writing about their memories in any order they choose, and join a writers’ group specializing in memoirs.
 
The keys to a good memoir essay are the same as for any essay: show, don’t tell, by using active, descriptive, sensory words and phrases. Paint a picture for the reader with your words. Set the piece in a clear time and place. Introduce us to the characters in your story. Use dialogue if it helps. In terms of technique, the memoir essay probably shares more with fiction than any other type of personal essay.
 
I once read a beautifully written essay in (the sadly, now-defunct) Hallmark Magazine about the writer’s recollection of her father’s beloved toolbox. It was rich with memories and emotions, and all the more compelling because it was a true story.
 
So reach back into your memories and old scrapbooks and start putting some of your stories down on the page in your next personal essay. 
 

Abigail Green has published more than 150 articles and essays in regional and national publications including American Baby, Baltimore Magazine, Bride’s, Cooking Light, and Health. Her work also appears in the new book, “A Cup of Comfort for New Mothers.” (Adams Media, 2009). Abby holds a B.A. from Vassar College and an M.A. in publishing from the University of Baltimore. She writes the “Crib Notes” column for The Writer Mama e-zine and the “Understanding Personal Essays” column for Writers on the Rise. A mother of two boys, she blogs about parenting, publishing and more at http://diaryofanewmom.blogspot.com.

Understanding Personal Essays: A Traveler’s Tales

Abigail Green

By Abigail Green

How could you not be enticed into reading an essay titled “In the Land of the Surfing Hippos” or “Hemorrhoids in Holland”? Of all the genres of essays, travel essays are among my favorite to read. I enjoy reading about places I’ve been or am going, but essays about exotic destinations I’ll never visit are even better. I get to be an armchair tourist for a little while, experiencing a true-life adventure through the writer’s eyes.

Travel essays can range from first-person destination guides to literary non-fiction pieces that never mention a hotel or restaurant. As with any essay, you’ll want to tailor yours to the publication you’re targeting.

I’ve had the most success publishing travel pieces that are a combination of first-person essays and practical information. For instance, I wrote a piece for a newspaper travel section on do-it-yourself “babymoons” for expectant parents after I’d planned one myself. My essay about a trip to Costa Rica, which ran in a business magazine, included a sidebar with travel tips and resources.

No matter what format your travel essay takes, it’s essential to paint a vivid picture for readers by using active, sensory words and descriptions. Here’s an example I use in my class, “Personal Essays That Get Published”:

I could have started my essay with this perfectly acceptable lead:
Much of Costa Rica is covered by dense rainforest. Average rainfall ranges from 75 to 120 inches a year. Thick, towering trees and foliage form canopies high above ground, home to such animals as howler monkeys and sloths. Canopy tours give brave tourists an up-close-and-personal view of Costa Rica’s flora and fauna.

But isn’t the one I actually used so much more descriptive?
The sloth is giving me the eye. From his dry perch beneath a canopy of leaves, he’s taking in the view of a sopping-wet tourist-me-dangling above the Costa Rican wilderness. I am harnessed and hanging from a cable strung through the treetops of the country’s rainforest. I can see what he’s thinking: “There’s a reason we call this a rainforest.”

If you aspire to write travel essays, get your hands on The Best American Travel Writing anthologies. Not only can you study the best writers, but also you’ll get a good idea of where travel essays are published. A recent issue reveals not only the usual suspects like National Geographic, Travel + Leisure, and the New York Times, but also Runner’s World, Slate.com, and South Florida Sun-Sentinel.

Don’t think your destinations are exotic enough? Remember: “exotic” is subjective. How else do you explain how I once sold a travel essay about visiting Hershey, Pa., the chocolate capital of the U.S., to a newspaper in South Africa?

Sources: “In the Land of the Surfing Hippos,” by Michael Fay. First published in National Geographic, Aug. 2004. “Hemorrhoids in Holland,” by Suzanne Lafetra. Published in Whose Panties Are These? More Misadventures from Funny Women on the Road (Travelers’ Tales, 2004).

Abigail Green has published more than 150 articles and essays in regional and national publications including American Baby, Baltimore Magazine, Bride’s, Cooking Light, and Health. Her work also appears in the new book, “A Cup of Comfort for New Mothers.” (Adams Media, 2009). Abby holds a B.A. from Vassar College and an M.A. in publishing from the University of Baltimore. She writes the “Crib Notes” column for The Writer Mama e-zine and the “Understanding Personal Essays” column for Writers on the Rise. A mother of two boys, she blogs about parenting, publishing and more at http://diaryofanewmom.blogspot.com.

Understanding Personal Essays: A Healthy Niche

Abigail Green

By Abigail Green

If there’s one subject people never seem to tire of, it’s their health. Their latest ailment, how much (or little) they’re sleeping, the newest diet or exercise fad-it’s all fodder for discussion. Or, in the case of essayists, exposition.

Even if you don’t think of yourself as a health writer, you’d be wise to consider this popular niche within the personal essay genre. First-person health pieces can run the gamut from essays about how you lost weight to the pros and cons of getting a tattoo removed, how to choose a new doctor, whether the latest nutritional supplement really works, and much, much more.

Health essays don’t just run in health and fitness publications, either. You’ll find them in newspapers, parenting and travel magazines, and general interest magazines, as well as specialty publications targeted to pregnant women, seniors, or people with diabetes. The possibilities are virtually limitless.

So how do you approach this popular niche? First, understand that health essays need to interest people other than your doctor. Editors and readers aren’t going to be riveted by your first-hand account of losing your love handles unless you can make it relevant to them. While certain topics never seem to get old-weight loss, sleep, and sex, for example-it’s precisely because these subjects are so frequently covered that writers need to find a fresh angle.

Did you get in shape thanks to a hot, new pole-dancing class at your gym? Were you able to cure your chronic insomnia using natural remedies? Did you find a miracle food that boosted your lagging libido? A fresh, first-person account of a common health issue may be just the thing to grab an editor’s attention.

One caveat: if your experience is too unique, that could work against you. For instance, if you have been diagnosed with a rare disease, publications may not want an essay on a condition most of their readers have never heard of, let alone suffer from. The exception? A current event makes your condition newsworthy. A great example is Kawasaki syndrome-a relatively rare childhood disease that was all over the news recently when John Travolta’s son reportedly died from complications stemming from the syndrome. An essay about your child’s experience with the disease is almost sure to sell.

Another thing that sets the health essay apart from other personal essays is that it often includes reporting. That is, in addition to the writer’s own experience, the piece may include facts, statistics, and quotes from medical experts. This information is not hard to find. Start by visiting the Centers for Disease Control website or by interviewing your family doctor.

Scan the publications you read regularly for first-person health articles. Mine your family’s and your own medical history for subject matter. It’s worth your time to explore this personal essay niche, which can be a healthy addition to your freelance portfolio.

Abigail Green has published more than 150 articles and essays in regional and national publications including American Baby, Baltimore Magazine, Bride’s, Cooking Light, and Health. Her work also appears in the new book, “A Cup of Comfort for New Mothers.” (Adams Media, 2009). Abby holds a B.A. from Vassar College and an M.A. in publishing from the University of Baltimore. She writes the “Crib Notes” column for The Writer Mama e-zine and the “Understanding Personal Essays” column for Writers on the Rise. A mother of two boys, she blogs about parenting, publishing and more at http://diaryofanewmom.blogspot.com.

Understanding Personal Essays: Parenting and Publishing

Abigail Green

By Abigail Green

If there’s any topic that lends itself particularly well to the personal essay, it’s parenting. Let’s face it: families are a gold mine of material. From pregnancy to child-rearing to caring for aging parents, the “parenting” category encompasses a wide range of issues.

Fittingly, there are numerous publications that print parenting essays — from the aptly titled Parents and Parenting magazines to the more cerebral Brain, Child to websites like Babble.com. You can also find these essays in markets not specifically geared towards parents, like the New York Times and AARP magazine.

Of course, it should come as no surprise that practically every freelance writer who’s a parent tries his or her hand at penning parenting essays. That means the competition’s stiff. Parenting’s “Mom’s Eye View” department, for instance, is a favorite of freelancers. But since the magazine publishes just 12 issues a year, that means that out of hundreds of essay submissions editors can only buy a dozen. I’ve been discouraged to get the response: “We like your piece, but unfortunately we have too much in inventory already.”

The good news about parenting essays is, you have plenty of options. You could:

Reslant your essay. Let’s say you wrote a personal essay about co-sleeping. You could easily get some quotes from doctors and other parents and turn your essay into a first-person reported piece. Similarly, you could rework a straightforward topic as a humorous essay.

Think outside the essay slot. Lots of magazines have one clearly labeled essay section. Some that I know of are titled “In Your Words”; “Self Expression”; and “My Turn.” However, outside that department the publication may run other first-person pieces, even if they’re not labeled as such. Put on your detective’s hat. Is there a travel or health essay masquerading as a regular article? A big clue is whether the writer uses “I” in the lead.

Broaden your definition of parenting. Along the lines of the previous tip, you may increase your odds of selling your parenting essays if you expand your thinking. Sure, parenting essays can be about choosing a name for your baby, potty training your toddler, and finding a babysitter, but they can also be about finding time for yourself after kids, your relationship with your spouse, and getting back in shape after baby.

Step off the beaten path. The trouble with many of the national parenting magazines is that everybody knows about them. Why not try to sell your essay to a regional parenting magazine? (Google the term and you’ll find dozens.) Or how about a bridal magazine for an essay on your daughter’s wedding? Or a travel magazine for an essay about your family reunion at Yellowstone? Newspapers, websites, and anthologies like the Chicken Soup and Cup of Comfort series are other markets that publish tons of personal essays on parenting topics.

Writing and selling parenting essays can be fun, challenging, satisfying, frustrating, easy, and time-consuming-just like raising kids!

Abigail Green is a freelance writer in Baltimore. Over the past 12 years, she has written for national, regional and online publications including AOL, Bride’s, Baltimore Magazine, Cooking Light and Health. She blogs about the lighter side of pregnancy, parenthood and potty training at Diary of a New Mom. She teaches Personal Essays that Get Published, a six-week e-mail class.

Understanding Personal Essays: Funny Business

Abigail Green

By Abigail Green

So you think you’re funny, do you? For essay writers, funny is good. Humor can spice up nearly any topic, from parenting to cooking to travel.

As we all know, however, there are vastly different kinds of humor. There’s David Sedaris funny, and there’s Erma Bombeck funny. There’s Dave Barry funny, and there’s Jon Stewart funny. There’s Christian humor and feminist humor and political humor and nearly any other niche you can think of.

You will have the best luck selling your humor essays if you find a market (or several) that fits your natural voice. That is, if you write in a jokey, “bad-da-boom” style, you’ll probably find markets like Reader’s Digest more receptive to your work than, say, The Atlantic. If you write feel-good, G-rated parenting humor, Family Circle’s a better bet than The Onion. If you’re not already, you should be reading the type of humor essays you like to write. Check out these markets, or Google “humor writers” and start surfing.

Now let’s look at a specific market. Each issue, Smithsonian magazine publishes an approximately 500-word humor essay called “The Last Page.” You can read writer’s guidelines and samples online or in back issues at the library. That will give you an idea of the range of topics and general voice of the department. In targeting any publication, tweak your essay to fit. Are there a lot of punchy one-liners? Or is it a more cerebral type of humor? (BTW, humor essays are always submitted in their entirety. How can you judge funny without reading the whole thing?)

As you might guess, Smithsonian is geared towards a more high-brow audience than, say, Mad magazine. Sometimes a publication’s tastes are obvious, and sometimes they’re a bit more subtle. I only learned through experience, for example, that Washingtonian magazine would never, ever publish an essay about seeing one’s boss naked. Their loss; the Boston Globe had no such qualms. The Christian Science Monitor may balk at an essay about drunken exploits, but Maxim magazine might snap it up.

Sadly, I can’t give you many specifics on HOW to be funny in your essays. I’m afraid funny is either something you are, or you aren’t. However, I CAN tell you that specifics, hyperbole, and the unexpected are keys to “funnying” up an already humorous essay. For example, “This new mom is exhausted” is not nearly as funny as “My new baby keeps me busier than a one-legged man in a butt-kicking contest.” Anyone can be hungry enough to eat a horse, but only the truly funny are so starved they could eat their weight in hot wings. See what I’m saying?

If you want to write funny, start by reading the greats-whether to you that means Woody Allen or Stephen Colbert-and note where you laugh out loud. Personally, I find inspiration from a celebrity fashion blog. Read it! Those gals are masters at crafting witty retorts, I tell you. Then read your own work out loud, preferably to an audience, and note where people laugh. From there, it’s just a matter of time before you tickle the right editor’s funny bone.

Abigail Green is a freelance writer in Baltimore. Over the past 12 years, she has written for national, regional and online publications including AOL, Bride’s, Baltimore Magazine, Cooking Light and Health. She blogs about the lighter side of pregnancy, parenthood and potty training at Diary of a New Mom. She teaches Personal Essays that Get Published, a six-week e-mail class.


RSS RSS Subscribe to Writers on the Rise

  • This Blog Moving to ChristinaKatz.com as of December 30, 2009… December 27, 2009
    We’re moving! Writers on the Rise archives have been here for years. I hope that WordPress will let the archive live on for a good long time. However, it’s time to move on, bittersweet as change may be. Please come and find me at my new digs: http://christinakatz.com. And while we’re both thinking of it, […]
    The Writer Mama

RSS RSS Subscribe to WOTR Comments

a

Christina Katz's Facebook profile
April 2014
M T W T F S S
« Dec    
 123456
78910111213
14151617181920
21222324252627
282930  

Blog Stats

  • 244,976 hits

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 65 other followers