Archive for the 'Time Management for Writers' Category

Time Management Mastery: The Online Resumé

October 2007 Family Fun MagazineBy C. Hope Clark

Most writers are accustomed to writing short biographies for articles or query letters, but few possess a full-fledged resumé of their attributes and abilities. That’s because few editors or agents request such a thing. While you may never need to send a paper resumé, an online resumé can fill several needs with little effort and doesn’t have to be limited to one or two pages like its paper counterpart. Here are three reasons an online resumé is handy:

1. For your personal record. As you publish more, or as you accomplish more in your career, you need a place to record the facts. Flipping into your website, you can note the latest byline, possibly with a link to where it’s located on the Web. I’ve referred to my resumé often when creating or updating my short bio or promotional blurb.

2. For editors and agents. While they say they don’t want your life’s history, they may be intrigued by your previous job experience or that strange degree that has nothing to do with writing. They may check out your website before signing with you, just to have a peek at who you are. I once had an editor call me out of the blue to do a piece on agricultural careers for a teenage magazine. She found me from my resumé, which also confirmed my degree in agronomy and background with the U.S. Department of Agriculture. For this assignment, my online resumé earned me $750.

3. For your readership. When a reader discovers your work and likes your writing, he wants to know more about the author. Your resume feeds that hunger, keeping him interested in your writing career and your future releases.

The items in a resumé consist of identification, employment, published material,
education, awards and professional affiliations. Make the font bold and legible and the layout professionally simple. For an example of my online resumé. For a great lesson on how to prepare an online and an email resumé, see The Riley Guide. Some free examples and templates can be found at 1st Writers.

Emphasize the writing aspect of your life and abbreviate anything else. This resumé is for your writing career.

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C. Hope Clark is founder and editor of FundsforWriters.com, annually recognized by Writer’s Digest in its poll of 101 Best Web Sites for Writers. She delivers four newsletters each week to thousands with her specialty being grants and income opportunities for writers of all sizes. She’s published over 200 articles on paper and online. Those reluctant to promote their writing cherish her trade paperback The Shy Writer: An Introvert’s Guide to Writing Success. Find more hope for your writing career at www.fundsforwriters.com & www.theshywriter.com.

Time Management Mastery: Making the Most of a Writing Conference

October 2007 Family Fun Magazine
I admit it. I used to adlib at conferences. Planning for what is heavily a social event seemed over the top. But after missing a few opportunities, I’ve changed. Coordination before a conference saves time, improves your odds and possibly opens doors for your writing future.

When you decide to attend a conference, list what you hope to derive from the trip before you go. You’re paying serious dollars to participate, so get your money’s worth. Research the conference inside and out beforehand. Study the speakers’ and panelists’ accomplishments to better prepare for their presentations. Become familiar with the conference chairman and active organizers of the event. Tell them thanks and hand them your card. Who knows? Maybe the next year your might come to mind as they’re seeking speakers and panelists.

Have your one-liners ready. Ponder what you’d be inclined to ask another writer and prepare a one-liner answer. Of course there’s the one-liner for your book, but what about the ones that explain: what you write, what you’ve published, why you write, what’s your latest project, what your goals are for your writing career. Memorize those answers and jot them in your notebook.

Make a point of greeting and conversing with at least six people per hour–that’s one every ten minutes. Of course you’ll speak with one for five minutes and another for fifteen. Don’t worry about being precise; just work the room. As a shy person this is painful, but setting a goal gives me a sense of determination to accomplish the task. I’m always glad I followed through. Have your business cards, postcards and bookmarks on hand-and share them with the people you meet.

Have your notepad handy to jot down items to remember after you finish a conversation. Make notes during breaks. You will not remember those blinding flashes of brilliance by the end of the conference. Be sure to come equipped with your list of goals so you can make any impromptu additions.

Write on the backs of business cards to remember which opportunity goes to which person. At the end of each day, review your notes, jot down any scattered thoughts, and prepare for the following day.

Finally, plan your wardrobe carefully, packing with clear definition for each day–down to the shoes that are comfortable and the shoes that look good at a banquet. Business casual is fine, but make it crisp and sharp. The better you look, the more confident you will feel and the more memorable you will be.

TIP: The best source for finding writing conferences is Shaw Guides. Another is Writers’ Conferences & Centers.

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C. Hope Clark is founder and editor of FundsforWriters.com, annually recognized by Writer’s Digest in its poll of 101 Best Web Sites for Writers. She delivers four newsletters each week to thousands with her specialty being grants and income opportunities for writers of all sizes. She’s published over 200 articles on paper and online. Those reluctant to promote their writing cherish her trade paperback The Shy Writer: An Introvert’s Guide to Writing Success. Find more hope for your writing career at www.fundsforwriters.com & www.theshywriter.com.

Time Management Mastery: Fingertip Promotion

October 2007 Family Fun MagazineBy C. Hope Clark

We all know that writers must have websites and blogs. But what about the age-old tools I call fingertip promotional items? Regardless of how much you write and promote your work online, sooner or later you have to meet face-to-face, shake hands and exchange information. Are you prepared with the tools to make those meetings productive? Business cards, postcards and bookmarks still mean business. These inexpensive promotions can make a big difference.

Business cards are a sign of good common sense and manners. You shake hands with an individual, make conversation and hand her your card as a courtesy. Some will toss them out and others collect them like souvenirs, but one card in the right hand can catapult your career. The key features of a professional card include:

  • Standard size of 3.5″ x 2″. Some people collect cards in folders or use card scanners. Unusual sizes often do not fit. Using a standard size makes it easy for people to save your information.
  • Basic information. Include your name, website and/or blog URL, phone number, email address and/or postal address. Mine has the FundsforWriters (my business) logo first and foremost, my name, the website URL, email and mailing address.
  • Define your role or title. Note briefly on the card what you are or what you do, such as: editor, freelance writer, educational writer, novelist, poet, etc.
  • Visual or graphical element. Whether logo, book cover or photo, make sure to include a visual. Using generic graphics doesn’t cut it if you want to be memorable after you pass off the card. I have one business card with just my book cover, the website URL, my name and the ISBN.
  • Individuality. For a couple of dollars more, you can get creative with business cards at discount places like Vistaprint. Can you guess how many writers have a card with a pen, pencil, typewriter or generic book on it? If you don’t want to blend in, I’d advise spending a little more to stand out from the crowd.


Postcards are a step up from business cards. At conferences I pass out postcards as well as business cards. Business acquaintances get the business card. Readers, newsletter members and fans get the postcards. Why? The postcard has more information on it, and it’s usable. I also use postcards to mail small reminders or simple requests. I want the post office to know about me, too.

Bookmarks are similar to the postcards. They are usable and large enough to print information and reference material such as where to buy your book–or even include an excerpt. Autograph your bookmark so people will want to save it.

You’ll want to keep a variety of each on hand at all times. I have a business card and postcard for FundsforWriters, my business, as well as for my book The Shy Writer. No matter the correspondence, one or the other goes into the envelope. Who knows who might get their hands on a card and wander to the website or email me about a fabulous opportunity?

TIPS: Most business card companies offer advice on designing a great and effective business card. Great FX Business Card is a good reference site. For a fantastic first impression, place your cards in a custom case from Netique.


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C. Hope Clark is founder and editor of FundsforWriters.com, annually recognized by Writer’s Digest in its poll of 101 Best Web Sites for Writers. She delivers four newsletters each week to thousands with her specialty being grants and income opportunities for writers of all sizes. She’s published over 200 articles on paper and online. Those reluctant to promote their writing cherish her trade paperback The Shy Writer: An Introvert’s Guide to Writing Success. Find more hope for your writing career at www.fundsforwriters.com & www.theshywriter.com.
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Time Management Mastery: The Postal Service Maze

October 2007 Family Fun MagazineBy C. Hope Clark
A busy writer who learns the ins and outs of the U.S. Postal Service can save hundreds of dollars in the course of a year. While it seems that  post office employees ask way more questions than necessary when you wait in line, in actuality, they may not ask all the questions needed to obtain the best rate for your mailings. Here are some tips for how to make the most of your USPS experience–and your budget.

First, request Media Mail (a lower rate for a slower delivery) if your package contains magazines, books, manuscripts, sound recordings, recorded videotapes, printed music, or recorded computer-readable media (such as CDs, DVDs, and diskettes). Media Mail cannot contain advertising except for incidental announcements of books. The maximum weight is 70 lbs, and the delivery time is usually ten days.

For magazines, newsletters and newspapers mailed at least four times a year, you have another lower cost called the Periodicals Rate. You need to apply to the Post Office to receive this rate.

Bound Printed Rate is another reduced expense rate for advertising, promotional, directory, or editorial material securely bound and not in a loose-leaf binder. It cannot contain personal correspondence or stationery.

Parcel Post is the standard way to send a package. It’s a higher rate usually than Media Mail, but these days the determinants for postage are based not only on weight but also on the shape and size of the package. The same weight in two different boxes can vary in cost. If you don’t want to wait the ten days for Media Mail, consider this rate.

If you are mailing books, sometimes Priority Flat Rate is best. Using the Postal Service’s Flat Rate mailing supplies, you get the same rate no matter how full you pack the box or envelope or how much it weighs. They charge nothing for these boxes, and you can keep a supply on hand.

Finding all these names and rates confusing? Want to make sure that you get the best rate? Visit the user friendly Postal Service website.

And while you’re shopping and educating yourself about postal options, don’t forget UPS, Federal Express and others. They offer competitive rates in many cases. (Note, however, they do not offer a reduced Media Rate.)

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C. Hope Clark is founder and editor of FundsforWriters.com, annually recognized by Writer’s Digest in its poll of 101 Best Web Sites for Writers. She delivers four newsletters each week to thousands with her specialty being grants and income opportunities for writers of all sizes. She’s published over 200 articles on paper and online. Those reluctant to promote their writing cherish her trade paperback The Shy Writer: An Introvert’s Guide to Writing Success. Find more hope for your writing career at www.fundsforwriters.com & www.theshywriter.com.

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Time Management Mastery: Mail Management Tips

October 2007 Family Fun MagazineBy C. Hope Clark

I didn’t realize the complexity of mail management until I became a writer. In stocking up the materials I need for my regular correspondence, my office has become a mini-office supply store. I recommend that you do the same by stocking up on these mailing basics:

· #10 envelopes — 4 1/8″ x 9 ½” business envelope for a tri-fold letter. These are absolutely necessary for the SASE required by agents, editors and publishers. Use self-adhesive envelopes (with peel-off tabs) if you can afford them. The folks on the other end will appreciate not having to lick the envelope. Make sure not to use these for submissions, even if only sending a query letter. Unfolding paper is one more obstacle between you and that editorial assistant reading tons of proposals

· 9″ x 12″ flat white envelopes — Use this envelope for your submissions, as it will hold your query and sample chapter or your magazine pitch neatly with no folds. The white has a cleaner, more professional appeal than yellow or manila-colored.

· 8.5″ x 11″ bubble envelopes — The perfect size for a trade paperback or a side-by-side stack of postcards about your book or business.

· Manuscript boxes, white 9″ x 12″ x 2 ½” — These will hold your manuscripts in neat order. Papyrus Place offers a sturdy box at a low price.

· Stationery — If you can afford it, and if you have committed to your writing business, splurge for stationery with a logo, address and url. A ream of paper and a box of 250 matching envelopes will last forever, and the professional image may get your foot in the door of a writing gig that can easily pay for the investment.

· Return labels — Unless you have a logo, go with plain black text on white, preferably Times New Roman or whatever font best matches your mailing label.

· Mailing labels — If your envelope won’t fit in your printer, use address-size labels for smaller envelopes and mailing-size labels for boxes and large envelopes. Learn how to prepare them centered and place them perfectly straight on the outside of the envelope. Use your best print quality. To mail The Shy Writer, I put a picture of the book to the left of the mailing address so the recipient can see what’s inside the envelope before she opens it. For more ideas, go to Avery.com , a well-known label manufacturer . Even the infamous Miss Snark, the blogging literary agent, has an Avery address label recommendation.

Neatness and a professional appearance send a significant message to the receiver.

Don’t cut corners after devoting hours, weeks and months on your masterpiece. Treat the mailing container as tenderly as you do the manuscript. Show the recipient that you are a class act with everything you do.

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C. Hope Clark is founder and editor of FundsforWriters.com, annually recognized by Writer’s Digest in its poll of 101 Best Web Sites for Writers. She delivers four newsletters each week to thousands with her specialty being grants and income opportunities for writers of all sizes. She’s published over 200 articles on paper and online. Those reluctant to promote their writing cherish her trade paperback The Shy Writer: An Introvert’s Guide to Writing Success. Find more hope for your writing career at www.fundsforwriters.com & www.theshywriter.com.

Time Management Mastery: Calendar Management

hope_000.gifA writer’s calendar is more than a reminder of the date. It’s a permanent record of the effort and work production of a serious artist. It’s a business tool to make a writer more successful. It’s a tax tool to help you track and manage deductions. A calendar can help you best when you develop a management routine, clearly noting items such as these:

  • Editorial deadlines. That doesn’t mean just the date your story is due. Your calendar should indicate the date the assignment was accepted, the drop-dead date and an interim date about a week before it’s due. If this is a major project, include dates of interviews, photographs and first drafts. These benchmarks keep you motivated while indicating to the IRS that you are a serious writer putting honest hours into your work.
  • Meetings. Chats and teleconferences can slip by easily without a reminder. In-person meetings are important to record, because every mile counts at tax time. Even your writer’s group should go on your calendar¬¬–if not as a reminder, as a record of activities contributing to your writing life.
  • Conferences and tours. Note the day you leave home and the day you return. This way your receipts and expenses coincide for tax purposes.
  • Completion dates. Maybe you didn’t have a deadline and you wrote a piece on spec or prepared a query. Note the date you sent it, then flip the pages and post a follow-up date.
  • Phone calls. You might appreciate knowing when you last spoke with a client before you call him again. An editor’s confirming phone call for an assignment should be recorded somewhere other than your memory.
  • Bills due. Note when your website hosting and domain registration are due for renewal. Missing those dates can be devastating to a writer relying upon a website for sales.
  • Benchmarks. You have your goals. For them to be realistic, they need measures. Give your plans tangible dates for follow-up to ensure you are successful with this year’s writing resolutions.
  • Expirations. Free trial offers of databases or online services can creep up and cost you. Note when they expire a few days ahead of time so you don’t miss the deadline.

Make your calendar work for you, and at the end of the year, you’ll have a comprehensive record of your writing life. With detailed documentation to prove that you earn a living as a writer, you will be eligible for all the deductions that go with the profession.

TIP: For great online calendars and calendar aids, see Calendar Zone. For an endless array of hands-on calendars, see Calendars.com.

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C. Hope Clark is founder and editor of FundsforWriters.com, annually recognized by Writer’s Digest in its poll of 101 Best Web Sites for Writers. She delivers four newsletters each week to thousands with her specialty being grants and income opportunities for writers of all sizes. She’s published over 200 articles on paper and online. Those reluctant to promote their writing cherish her trade paperback The Shy Writer: An Introvert’s Guide to Writing Success. Find more hope for your writing career at www.fundsforwriters.com & www.theshywriter.com.

Time Management Mastery: The Layman’s Version of Income Tax Management

hope_000.gifBy C. Hope Clark

An accountant I’m not. However, my parents are, and I’ve heard the horror stories about their tax clients who don’t know a receipt from a pizza menu or have thrown away tax benefits by forgetting to maintain records. The Internal Revenue Service (IRS) loves people who can’t keep records. That way when audits occur, the benefit falls on the side of the government. You and I can avoid that and keep more of our hard earned writing pay in our pockets. Here’s how:

  • Set up files with clearly marked labels like “income,” “meetings/ conferences,” “travel,” “supplies,” “bank statements” and “postage.” You may have other categories in mind, but the easiest way to determine which files you need is to look at a tax form and note the categories the IRS likes to see for a self-employed individual with a freelance business.
  • Keep files at your side––and use them. If your files are not handy, you won’t maintain them. Mine are to my right in a file drawer. I don’t leave my desk chair to toss receipts in them; deposit slips, mileage records and sales tickets are all filed properly.
  • Keep a calendar. You may lose a receipt, but if you consistently maintain a calendar of your comings, goings, submissions, payments, interviews and mileage, then the IRS will give you some latitude.
  • Keep a mileage log in your car. Or, do like I do and make mileage notes in your writing notebook; then transfer the information to your calendar when you return home. You’d be amazed at how many miles you travel for business that you forget to record. When you’re headed to the grocery store, if you stop by the office supply for printer ink, you can claim the round trip mileage. I try to organize my business trips alongside my personal needs so I don’t make duplicate trips.

You don’t need an elaborate system. Just introducing these few simple steps to your recordkeeping regimen can make tax time easier and less stressful––and will help you claim all expenses that are rightfully yours.

TIP: The Internal Revenue Service website has great resources. Freelance writer Cyndi Seidler, an author and professional organizer, has written a great article on organizing for income taxes.

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C. Hope Clark is founder and editor of FundsforWriters.com, annually recognized by Writer’s Digest in its poll of 101 Best Web Sites for Writers. She delivers four newsletters each week to thousands with her specialty being grants and income opportunities for writers of all sizes. She’s published over 200 articles on paper and online. Those reluctant to promote their writing cherish her trade paperback The Shy Writer: An Introvert’s Guide to Writing Success. Find more hope for your writing career at www.fundsforwriters.com & www.theshywriter.com.

Time Management Mastery: Benchmarks Measure Your Path to Publicaiton

October 2007 Family Fun MagazineNew Year’s resolutions ooze out of every publication on the planet in December and January. Still, I’m a fanatic about having a writing resolution each year. So far, knock on my wooden desk, I’ve successfully achieved nearly every resolution I’ve ever made. The secret is in setting and achieving clear goals along the way.

Making resolutions is easy: eat less, exercise more, write a novel, write everyday and so on. It’s establishing benchmarks, however, that make your resolutions meaningful-and achievable. Once you’ve set your New Year’s goals, hold them at arms’ length, pick up a calendar and decide how you will track and measure your performance along the way.

Three years in a row, I vowed to double my writing income. I succeeded. Sound easy? That resolution wouldn’t have been so simple to achieve if I hadn’t established measurements along the way. I set up a spreadsheet to track submissions, follow-up dates and my income.

At the end of each month, I calculated my average monthly income and an end-of-year income projection. If I’d waited until August to tally the numbers, I might have discovered I was way behind. The monthly benchmark kept me on target. If income was lagging behind my projections, I could quickly maneuver to pick up the slack before it was too late.

To keep on top of your self-imposed deadlines, purchase a week-at-a-glance calendar. My favorite is Bylines (www.bylinescalendar.com). Editor Sylvia Forbes devotes a writer’s picture and his or her 300 words of wisdom to each week of the year. I was lucky enough to be selected for a page in February 2007 and will be in 2008 as well. Bylines motivates me to keep up with my benchmarks, reminds me there are other ambitious writers like me and helps me maintain records for income tax time by offering a place to record mileage, meetings, chats and deadlines.

Making resolutions is a grand start. Defining clear performance, publication and income benchmarks along the way is better. Recording your progress is best. Add a dose of diligence to these efforts and you’ll have it made for 2008.
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C. Hope Clark is founder and editor of FundsforWriters.com, annually recognized by Writer’s Digest in its poll of 101 Best Web Sites for Writers. She delivers four newsletters each week to thousands with her specialty being grants and income opportunities for writers of all sizes. She’s published over 200 articles on paper and online. Those reluctant to promote their writing cherish her trade paperback The Shy Writer: An Introvert’s Guide to Writing Success. Find more hope for your writing career at www.fundsforwriters.com & www.theshywriter.com.

Butt-in-Chair Advice

hope_000.gifTime Management Mastery for Writers
By C. Hope Clark

Who doesn’t have a problem keeping, if not putting, one’s behind in the chair and writing? Let’s see a show of hands. I thought so. Any writer, if he or she tells the truth, has trouble with the stick factor of one’s derriere in a computer chair.

Following are some tips that can help you organize your writing station and yourself to ensure you spend more minutes facing the blank page on which you’re supposed to be writing, hopefully until you type The End.

1. Reference tools within arm’s reach. Don’t risk having an excuse to look for a book, a thesaurus, dictionary, calendar, address book or journal. Put them within three feet of where you’re sitting. And remember that most of these tools are online, if they’re not physically in reach.

2. Telephone. Same rules apply. Speaker phones and mobile phones are cheap these days. You don’t have to run catch the call…assuming you want to catch it at all. Jumping up to answer the phone makes you more susceptible to distraction, lengthening the time before you return to your writing duties.

3. Printer. Whether you are writing queries, sending out a stack of submissions or pitching agents with synopses, you’ll find yourself up and down like a pogo stick if your printer is not close. Put it within a yardstick’s distance from your desk.

4. Pictures. To the right and left of my computer screens are pictures and maps of Beaufort, South Carolina, the setting of my second novel. Every time I sit down, I’m immediately thrown into the story just by glancing up. These visual aids are a constant reminder of what I’m supposed to be doing. Photos, items that symbolize your protagonist––such as a watch, hat or brooch––even covers of the magazines you’re trying to pitch, can help trigger your creativity and inspire you to finish your assignment.

5. Next day’s work. At the end of each day, I place a to-do list, guidelines, edits, whatever needs doing the next day front and center on my desk. I duplicate the list on my Google To-Do Gadget home page so that if I miss it on my desk, I see it when I check e-mail.

By keeping all the ammunition you need to be successful within reach, you can keep yourself focused and help increase your productivity ten-fold.

C. Hope Clark is founder and editor of FundsforWriters.com, annually recognized by Writer’s Digest in its poll of 101 Best Web Sites for Writers. She delivers four newsletters each week to thousands with her specialty being grants and income opportunities for writers of all sizes. She’s published over 200 articles on paper and online. Her magazine credits include Writer’s Digest, The Writer Magazine, ByLine Magazine, NextStep Teen, College Bound Teen, Landscape Management Magazine, TURF Magazine, and American Careers Magazine. Hope is a motivational soul known as “Freelance Hope” in many circles. Those reluctant to promote their writing cherish her trade paperback The Shy Writer: An Introvert’s Guide to Writing Success. Find more hope for your writing career at www.fundsforwriters.com & www.theshywriter.com.

Writing On-the-Go

hope_000.gifTime Management for Writers

By C. Hope Clark

Anyone who knows me understands I like my life simple. Most everyone makes that claim, but how well do you follow through? The world is a busy place. Everyone is always coming and going, running and jogging through obligations and deadlines. When are you supposed to sit down and write?

The answer is simple: be a writer–––wherever you are. And no, that doesn’t mean carrying a suitcase of materials. Even when I’m riding with someone to the mall, I have my basic writing tools with me. It’s not hard. And the sooner this practice becomes a habit, the more prolific you’ll become as a writer. Here’s what you’ll need:

Spiral Notebook: Five-by-seven or four-by-six inches, it doesn’t matter. The point is to have something easy to carry and tuck into the glove box, your purse or your briefcase. The spiral feature makes it easier to lay flat and tuck a writing instrument inside for safekeeping throughout your travels. They are cheap, so no excuse; I buy them by the dozen. They’ve even accompanied me to the track where I challenge myself to think of a new editorial for each quarter-mile lap.

Pen: You know the style you like. I like a fine point, blue ink Zebra. I spend more on my pens than my notebooks, because picking up that pen makes me want to write more. I also write in the margins of my books, and this pen makes for better note taking. I use the clip to tuck it away in the notebook.

Non-Fiction, How-to Book: My current one is Immediate Fiction by Jerry Cleaver. If I have more than five minutes but less than 15, I open to my bookmark and study. I don’t like to waste the larger chunks of time reading when I can be writing. so I absorb my how-to material in between the gym, the grocery store and while waiting at the doctor’s office.

Camera (optional): If you have a streak of journalist in you, or you are one who likes to “see” your characters and settings, keep your camera handy. Frankly, you can carry a camera case as easily as a purse, so purchase a case that acts as both.

You can’t get any simpler than that. Not enough time to write? Oh, please.
C. Hope Clark is founder and editor of FundsforWriters.com, annually recognized by Writer’s Digest in its poll of 101 Best Web Sites for Writers. She delivers four newsletters each week to thousands with her specialty being grants and income opportunities for writers of all sizes. She’s published over 200 articles on paper and online. Her magazine credits include Writer’s Digest, The Writer Magazine, ByLine Magazine, NextStep Teen, College Bound Teen, Landscape Management Magazine, TURF Magazine, and American Careers Magazine. Hope is a motivational soul known as “Freelance Hope” in many circles. Those reluctant to promote their writing cherish her trade paperback The Shy Writer: An Introvert’s Guide to Writing Success. Find more hope for your writing career at www.fundsforwriters.com & www.theshywriter.com.


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